Humidifier FAQ’s – Humidifier Care Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Should my humidifier run 24 hours a day?
A: Yes, generally humidifiers operate day and night.

Q: Which Type of humidifier is safer – cool mist or warm mist?
A: Learn why some find a cool mist humidifier the safest.

Q: Can I add a bit of salt to my humidifier to produce an ocean mist?
A: Never add salt to any type of humidifier. If can destroy any metal components reducing your humidifier’s lifespan, clog your filter and hinder proper operation.

Q: My cool mist humidifier does not produce a mist; is something wrong?
A: You may have a type of humidifier that produces an invisible mist. If the unit is operating and the water level is dropping as it should, the unit is taking in air and returning an invisible mist back into the room. Your operating manual should also be able to confirm this type of operation.

Q: How do I know whether to get a cool or warm mist humidifier?
A: What’s the Difference Between a Cool and Warm Mist Humidifier?

Q: What would be a good size humidifier for a bedroom?
A: For an average size bedroom, a 700 – 900 sq ft capacity would be sufficient.

Q: How long will a 2 or 3 gallon humidifier run before refilling?
A: Usually 12 – 16 hours depending whether you run on low or high operation. A good rule of thumb is just fill it every night or morning to ensure continuous operation.

Read more:http://housewares.about.com/od/humidifiersdehumidifiers/qt/HumidifierFAQ.htm

The Best to Places to Put a Humidifier

If your home’s air tends to become dry during the summer or winter months, a humidifier is an affordable solution to restore moisture to the air. The placement of the humidifier depends on the use of the rooms in your home, as the bedroom and living room are common living spaces that benefit the most from moisture replenishment.

SainSonic AT28D 2.6L Ultrasonic Air Humidifier Purifier Aroma Diffuser

SainSonic AT28D 2.6L Ultrasonic Air Humidifier Purifier Aroma Diffuser

 

Bedroom

  • A lack of moisture in the air while you sleep increases the likelihood of nasal congestion, which causes coughing and interrupted sleep. The bedroom should be humid to improve your ability to breathe steadily while sleeping for a good night’s rest.

Living Room

  • The living room is often one of the most frequently used rooms of the home besides the bedroom, and it benefits from a warm- or cool-mist humidifier maintains your furniture and hardwood floors by providing moisture. According to Real Simple, the humidifier provides moisture to reduce wood cracking.

Child’s Room

  • Just as you benefit from a humidifier, a cool-mist humidifier moisturizes your child’s skin and decreases congestion caused by sinus problems. Cool-mist humidifiers are suggested over warm-mist, as the risk of injury is high if a child accidentally tips over the warm-mist humidifier.

Flat surfaces

  • Set the humidifier on a flat surface to avoid water leakage. The surface should be hard and not upholstered, as upholstered surfaces absorb moisture, allowing bacteria to grow in the fabric. Keep warm-mist humidifier at least two to three feet away from you to avoid accidental burns. For do-it-yourself humidifiers, place a pot full of tap water on top of a steam radiator to add moisture to the air.

Before buying a humidifier, you need to know this.

When winter comes around, the lack of natural humidity causes the air to dry out. The lack of moisture in the air is evident in the form of static electricity, dry skin, more dust and an increase in illnesses.

If the lack of humidity in your house is making your skin, throat or nasal passages dry, it’ s time to look in to buying the best humidifier. But which type of humidifier is the best? We break it down below.

The Five Types of Humidifiers:

Ultrasonic Humidifiers:
They produce a warm or cool mist by using a metal diaphragm vibrating at high-frequency. The sound vibrations propel moisture into the air. The water molecules that are produced are extremely small, about one micron in diameter. The mist is almost immediately absorbed into the air. Because this type of humidifier does not use a fan, it is very quiet when operating. Ultrasonic humidifiers typically do not use a filter.

SainSonic LM-168 500ML Ultrasonic LED Air Humidifier Aroma Diffuser

Unlike the humidifiers that boil water, the water droplets that are produced by an ultrasonic humidifier contain any impurities that are in the water tank which include minerals contained in hard water. If you use tap water in an ultrasonic humidifier it will produce a white dust on which can settle on nearby objects and furniture. If you use distilled water white dust is not produced. If you choose to use tap water you can use  our FLTDC Humidifier Decalcification Filter to prevent white dust from being created.

Additionally if you tank is not clean, pathogens growing in the reservoir can be expelled into the air. Guardian Technologies Pureguardian™ Ultrasonic humidifiers utilize Silver Clean™ Technology to fight the growth of mold and mildew on the surface of the water tank.

Warm-Mist:

These humidifiers tend to be the least expensive. They work by boiling water which produces steam. The steam is then cooled slightly before being released in to the air. Warm-mist tabletop units are quieter than the evaporative type of humidifiers, but they are also more costly to operate.

Warm-mist humidifiers can also raise the air temperature in a room which is nice in the winter but not so wonderful if you live in a warm location. If you have small children, using a warm-mist humidifier is not recommended because the heated water can cause accidental scalding. They are also not recommended if anyone in your house suffers from asthma due to the warm mist causing irritation to the airways.

Vaporizer:
 
A vaporizer boils water which then releases steam and moisture into the air. A medicated inhalant can also be added to the vaporizer to help diminish coughing spells. Vaporizers tend to be healthier to use than cool mist humidifiers because the steam is less likely to deliver impurities or microorganisms from the water in the holding tank. Boiling water requires a lot more energy than other methods.
  Impeller:
 

 

Impeller types of humidifiers, also called cool mist humidifiers, use a spinning disk to deliver water into a diffuser which then breaks the water into droplets that float into the air. Along with the water, they can also send microorganisms and dissolved minerals into the air which can settle as white dust onto surrounding household items. To prevent this it’ s recommended to fill them with distilled water which adds substantially to the cost of operating the humidifier.

Evaporative:
Evaporative humidifiers operate by soaking water up into a wick and expelling the moisture out with a fan. Large console humidifier models all make up this type. Small evaporative humidifiers are inexpensive and their filters assist in keeping microorganisms and minerals in the water from being sent into the air. However, it’ s very important to clean them regularly and have their filters changed when recommended. The evaporative humidifier is the most common one on the market. They are also called cool mist or wick humidifiers.

Evaporative humidifiers have 3 basic parts, the wick, the water reservoir and the fan. The wick is a filter that soaks up water from the reservoir and gives it a larger surface area for it to evaporate from. The fan is next to the wick and blows air onto it to help with the water evaporation.

The water evaporates based on the relative humidity of the room. A room with low humidity will allow water to evaporate more quickly compared to a room which has high humidity. Therefore, this type of humidifier regulates itself. As the humidity of the room goes up, the water vapor goes down.

The wicks or filters become moldy if they are not dried out between reservoir fillings. They also can become filled with mineral deposits over time. The filters need regular rinsing or replacement. If this isn’ t done, air cannot pass through the wick and the humidifier stops humidifying the area. You’ ll know the humidifier is not operating properly by the water remaining at the same level in the tank.

This article is from:http://www.guardiantechnologies.com/types-of-humidifiers.asp

How to Diffuse Essential Oils with a Humidifier?

 

Essential oils are highly concentrated extracts from plants and are used in a variety of ways to improve the smell of your house, office or room. They are also used to improve moods and sooth minds. You can use essential oils in your bath, in lotions or beauty products, household cleaning and even bug repellents. One popular way to diffuse the smell of essential oils is to put the oil in a humidifier. The humidifier then spreads the scent of your essential oil throughout the entire room.

Instructions

1. Open the water chamber of your humidifier. This is the area where you pour the water into the humidifier.

2. Add three to nine drops of the essential oil. The scent you choose is completely up to you, so select a scent that you’re drawn to. Some popular choices include eucalyptus, lavender and rose

3. Turn the humidifier on and let it run through the night. If you want to use the humidifier during the day, add three to nine more drops of essential oil as the scent wears off.

SainSonic LM006 150ML Ultrasonic LED Air Humidifier Aroma

Diffuser

Tips & Warnings

1.As an alternative to the humidifier method, add several drops of essential water to boiling or very hot water. Let the water set and the steam will diffuse the scent of your essential oil through the air.

2.Clean the humidifier after each use with the essential oil. It’s possible that the essential oil may damage the plastic parts of your humidifier. This is not common but is still a risk to consider.

21 Things You Should Know About Using Essential Oils

21 Things You Should Know About Essential Oils

  • Essential oils are not really oils. They do not contain the fatty acids that constitute what we would consider an actual oil. Valerie Gennari Cooksley, author of Aromatherapy: Soothing Remedies to Restore, Rejuvenate and Heal defines essential oils as “highly concentrated plant constituents possessing potent medicinal and cosmetic qualities.” However, I think Stephanie Tourles nailed it in Organic Body Care recipes when she said, “I consider essential oils the life force or the soul of the plant.”
  • Most essential oils are high in antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral properties: This makes them an excellent addition to your homemade cleaning preparations. Oils that are best for cleaning are: Lemon, grapefruit, eucalyptus, peppermint, tea tree, lavender, and rosemary.
  • Essential oils are miniscule in molecular size, which means they are absorbed well by the skin – making them perfect ingredients in personal care items intended to heal, soften, and nourish. However, they do not accumulate in the body over time – they simply offer up their healing properties and then pass on through.
  • Scientific studies have shown that rosemary essential oil helps your brain perform. Specifically, smelling rosemary essential oil helps memory recall and performance on tests. Interestingly, this study also showed that groups that inhaled either rosemary or lavender essential oil felt much more relaxed than those who inhaled no odor at all.
  • Fragrance oils and essential oils are NOT the same thing. As a rule of thumb, if you see the word “fragrance” or “fragrance oil” or even “perfume” on anything, you can assume this is synthetic and NOT natural. (Even if it says natural fragrance.)
  • Essential oils are wholly natural and cannot be patented; which means that you’ll never see an essential oil in a pharmaceutical drug. As such, you can expect that the vast majority of mainstream healthcare practitioners will never recommend essential oils as therapeutic alternatives to drugs. More importantly, because essential oils cannot be patented, drug companies will not waste money studying them. This limits our scientific knowledge of essential oils GREATLY, and the majority of what we know about them are things that have been passed down through thousands of years of personal use and experimentation.
  • Enormous amounts of plants are needed to produce essential oil. In fact, on the extreme end, it takes 4000 pounds of Bulgarian roses to produce 1 pound of essential oil. Other plants like lavender only take 100 pounds of plant material to produce a pound of essential oil. Still, can you imagine how concentrated essential oils must be, in light of how many plants are used to produce them?
  • Most essential oils should never be used undiluted on the skin. Instead, they should be combined with “real” oils (called carrier oils), waxes, butters, alcohols, or other diluting measures. Because they’re so concentrated, if you don’t dilute, you may end up with an unfortunate reaction (and unhappy skin).
  • There are a few essential oils that are generally recognized as safe to use undiluted. Of course, there has to be a few exceptions to the rule. Again, in Organic Body Care Recipes, the author points out that the only essential oils that are widely acknowledged as safe to use undiluted (sparingly) are: lavender, German chamomile, tea tree, sandalwood, and rose geranium.
  • Never use an undiluted essential oil on a baby or child. Children have much thinner, more delicate skin than adults have, and tend to be very sensitive to the potency of essential oils. In fact, even if you do use essential oil in a recipe for children, only use half of the essential oil recommended in the recipe. That’s all they’ll need, anyway. (Here is a list of 19 essential oils that are safe for babies and children.)
  • Avoid the following essential oils while pregnant or nursing (and skip EOs completely in your first trimester): Aniseed, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, ginger, jasmine, lemon, nutmeg, rosemary, sage (this is only a partial list of some of the more common essential oils – view the full one here).
  • To test if you’re sensitive to an essential oil (which is probably best to do before using it in a skincare preparation): Combine one drop of essential oil with 1/2 tsp carrier oil (like olive, jojoba, or sweet almond). Rub this on the inside, upper portion of your arm and wait a few hours. If no redness or itching develops, you’re most likely not sensitive to that essential oil.
  • Keep all essential oils out of the reach of children – and avoid contact with your eyes. This is just standard safety precautions, but must be mentioned.
  • Do not take essential oils internally, especially oils like wintergreen and eucalyptus. While some essential oils may be used well-diluted in something like toothpaste with safety, it’s generally recognized that there’s no need to take essential oils internally. In fact, there are several toxic essential oils that should be avoided even through skin contact. Luckily, these are NOT common essential oils, and most of them you’ll never find in the store.
  • Not all essential oils are created equally, nor does more expensive necessarily mean “better.” There are certain brands I will use in a less therapeutic fashion (like for cleaning), because they’re far less expensive than their counterparts. When you see a wide fluctuation in price between, say, lavender essential oils, you can bet that the far less expensive one is likely lower in quality. However, a small variation in price differences on the higher end will NOT mean a better essential oil. It will just mean a higher price. (A little birdie also told me that there are also only a handful of essential oil distilleries in the world, which means that most essential oils come from the exact same places – thus there is little difference in quality between the more “typically priced” EOs.) What I’m saying here is: Understand that you DO have to pay for quality, but that if you’re just using essential oils in non-therapeutic fashions, it’s okay to use less expensive oils (like the Beeyoutiful ones pictured at the top of this post, or NOW brand essential oils). But if you want high quality, I suggest using Mountain Rose Herbs or another ethical supplier that offers organic essential oils (grown without pesticides or toxic fertilizers).
  • To test your essential oil to see how “pure” it is, put a single drop of it on a piece of construction paper. If it evaporates quickly and leaves no noticeable ring, it is pure. If you have a ring left, then it is likely diluted by the manufacturer with an oil of some sort (this test will not work for myrrh, patchouli, and absolutes).
  • Essential oils will last for at least 5 years (if not 10), so one bottle could literally last you a decade. Hopefully that thought will help mitigate the cost involved in purchasing some essential oils. Because they are SO concentrated and only a tiny amount is needed in anything you do, they’ll last you a very, very long time. The only exception to this rule is citrus oils, which will see a reduction in potency after a year or two.
  • Store your essential oils in dark glass bottles (which they were probably packaged in) and out of direct sunlight. This is simply to help preserve their potency.
  • Remember that what you’re allergic to in food, you will be allergic to in essential oils. So if, for some reason, you can’t eat sage without breaking out in a rash, steer clear of sage essential oil (or any product containing it).
  • USE ESSENTIAL OILS TO HELP YOUR MOOD. Lavender, peppermint, grapefruit, chamomile, lemon, ylang-ylang all help produce happy, joyous moods. Clary sage helps with PMS (although there have been reports that overuse of clary sage can lead to intoxication). Rosemary increases focus and concentration. Don’t forget the mood benefits of essential oils. Here’s an information packed aromatherapy reference chart to refer to.
  • The recommended usage of many essential oils is hotly contested throughout the aromatherapy profession. The majority of oils you find in the supermarket are absolutely safe (though you should research them before using them); however, once you start digging into the world of essential oils, you’ll find that professionals – even within the same organization – debate extensively over the use of certain oils. If you’re ever unsure about an oil or its use, do the research you can, and if you still cannot make up your mind as to its safety – avoid it. But, by all means, do NOT be afraid of essential oils. Just use them with care and respect, and all will be fine.

Recommended Essential Oils to Get You Started

“What essential oils do you recommend I buy?” is the number one question I receive.

It’s a tough one to answer, because what EOs you buy depends on what you’re going to use them for. Nonetheless, I’ve narrowed it down to 7 essential oils to consider when starting to use them in your personal care products or homemade cleaning supplies.

  • Peppermint (good for lip balms, oily/acneic skin, and cleaning products)
  • Rosemary (good for hair preparations, oily/acneic skin, and cleaning products)
  • Sweet orange (good for all skin types and very soothing in room sprays for children)
  • Rose geranium (good for all skin types, creating perfumes, and for use in homemade moisturizers)
  • Tea tree (great for healing, getting rid of dandruff, oily/acneic skin, and cleaning products)
  • Lavender (great for all skin types, for relaxation, hair preparations, and cleaning products)
  • Lemon (great for lifting moods, cleaning preparations, and sparingly in toners and products for oily skin)

All of these essential oils also happen to be some of the least expensive and easiest to find. Bonus!

Where should you buy them?

  • Mountain Rose Herbs
  • More Than Alive (who graciously supplied Crunchy Betty with the Beeyoutiful essential oils found in the first picture)
  • Whole Foods/Trader Joes (or your local natural foods store)
  • iHerb (use my personal code OZE706 at checkout to get $5 off your first purchase there)

read more :

http://www.crunchybetty.com/21-things-you-should-know-about-essential-oils

How to Clean out a Humidifier?

Humidifiers moisten indoor air and are useful for treating cold and flu symptoms, healing dry skin and helping babies sleep more peacefully. Humidifies that are not cleaned properly may pump bacteria into the air, so it’s important to use the right technique and clean your machine out often. Learn how to perform a basic cleaning, disinfect the humidifier and prevent bacterial growth.

Performing a Basic Cleaning

1.Rinse the filter. Unplug the humidifier first, then remove the filter. Hold it under the faucet and rinse it with cold water to wash away any impurities. Let it on a clean towel to dry while you clean the remaining parts.

 

  • Don’t use cleaning solution to clean the filter. Chemicals can permanently damage the filter so that it will no longer work properly.
  • You may have a model of humidifier that requires you to change the filter every now and then. If this is the case, check the manufacturer’s instructions and change the filter as often as is recommended.\

2. Wash the water tank. Remove the tank from the humidifier and pour out the old water. Fill the tank with 3 cups of vinegar, swish it around so that it covers the bottom and sides of the tank, and let it sit for at least 1 hour. The vinegar acts as a natural cleanser that loosens buildup from the bottom of the water tank. Rinse the tank thoroughly when you’re finished.

 

  • If necessary, use a scrub brush to scrub away some of the grime at the bottom of the water tank.
  • Using another type of cleaner could have negative consequences, since the liquid from the water tank gets pumped into the air. Stick with vinegar to make sure you’re creating a safe environment for your family.

3.Wipe down the frame. Use a sponge dampened with vinegar and water to wipe the remaining parts of the humidifier. This prevents dust and other debris from entering the water tank, and inhibits the growth of mold or bacteria.

 

Disinfecting the Humidifier

1.Use a bleach and water solution. Pour a gallon of water and a teaspoon of bleach into the water tank. Let the solution sit in the tank for an hour to completely sanitize the inside of the tank. Pour out the solution and rinse with clean, cold water.

  • Be sure the tank has been thoroughly rinsed before you replace it on the humidifier frame.
  • Don’t let the bleach sit in the humidifier for more than an hour, or it could damage the machine.

2.Use peroxide. Pour a few cups of peroxide into the water tank. Swish it around so that it covers the bottom and sides of the tank. Allow the peroxide to sit in the tank for an hour, then pour it out and rinse the tank with cold water.

3.Do a deep clean with vinegar. Fill the water tank with a cup of vinegar and a gallon of water. Plug it in outside and let the humidifier run for an hour. After an hour, pour out the remaining liquid from the tank, rinse it with clean water, then fill it with clean water and run the humidifier for another hour. Rinse out the tank one more time before using.

  • Don’t run the humidifier run indoors when you’re using vinegar in the water tank. It will make your home smell like vinegar.
  • Don’t use bleach or any other chemical to do a deep clean through the working part of the humidifier. Turning the humidifier on and running chemicals through the system could cause permanent damage.

Preventing Bacterial Growth

1.Change the water often. Leaving water to sit in the water tank for long periods of time causes mineral deposits to collect on the bottom and sides. The longer you leave the water sitting there, the more deposits will collect and the harder they’ll be to remove.

2.Clean the humidifier every three days. When the humidifier is in heavy use during the winter or when a family member has a cold, clean it every three days with a simple vinegar or hydrogen peroxide rinse. Do a deep clean every two weeks or so.

3.Replace the humidifier when necessary. Old humidifiers that have gotten a lot of use may start to break down over time. The worn-out parts will be more prone to hosting bacterial growth.

  • If you’ve had your humidifier for more than a five years or so, you might want to consider replacing it.
  • If you aren’t ready to replace your older humidifier, make sure to clean it with bleach or peroxide every few weeks.

4.the area around the humidifier dry. If the humidifier is causing the area around it to become damp, turn it down. Surrounding the humidifier with dampness can lead to the growth of bacteria and mold.

5.Store the humidifier properly. When it’s time to put the machine away after the winter, clean it thoroughly and make sure it is completely dry before putting it away. When you take it out again next year, clean it again before using.

read more:http://www.wikihow.com/Clean-out-a-Humidifier

How to Use a Dehumidifier

Dehumidifiers are designed to regulate the amount of moisture that is in the air of a given space. Follow these steps to ensure you use a dehumidifier properly.

1.Select the correct capacity for your space.

7

 

The efficiency of a dehumidifier is based on the space you have as well as how moist that space is. The capacity is listed in measurements of the number of pints the dehumidifier collects per 24-hour period. Conditions can range from moderately damp to extremely damp. Dehumidifiers can accommodate up to 44 pints (20.8197 liters) per 24 hours in a space as large as 2,500 square feet (232.257 square meters).

2.Find a safe and appropriate location for your dehumidifier.

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You can place the unit against a wall if your dehumidifier has a top-mounted air discharge. However, if this is not the case, you will need to keep the dehumidifier away from the walls and other obstructions to allow the air to circulate around the machine. It is also important to keep doors and windows closed while you are running the dehumidifier to help it run more efficiently. Keep. your dehumidifier away from sources of debris or other objects that can clog the machine.

3.Be aware of the temperature

The air temperature in the room where you are running your dehumidifier may increase as the moisture is removed. This is perfectly normal and should not pose any problems. The time for concern may be, though, if the area in which you run your unit is consistently below 65 degrees Fahrenheit (18.3 Celsius). Frost may begin to appear on the coils of the dehumidifier, which could cause the unit to work improperly. In these cases, you should purchase a dehumidifier that has an anti frost sensor or one that is created specifically for cool spaces.

4.Allow the humidifier to run through several cycles.

The first time you use your dehumidifier will be the most productive. You will be removing the majority of the excess water in the air over the first few hours, days or sometimes even weeks. After the first round, though, you will be simply maintaining an appropriate level of humidity rather than trying to bring it down drastically. You will be able to set the amount of humidity that you desire on your dehumidifier when you plug it in.

5.Maintain your dehumidifier.

You will need to empty you dehumidifier on a regular basis in order to keep it running properly and efficiently. How often you do this will depend on the size of your space and the amount of humidity you are dealing with. Some areas may require the bucket of water to be emptied once a day, while others may only need to be drained once per week. Keep an eye on your dehumidifier to determine what it will take to keep it running.

 

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 SainSonic LM-001BE Ultrasonic 100ML LED Air Humidifier Aroma Diffuser

Quick Overview

  • Eases Breathing & Sleep better; Coloful changing LED lamp, romantic and convenient.
  • LED Light Diffuser relieves depression, stress, fatigue & headaches.
  • 100ml water capacity that can continue use up to 3 hours each time.
  • Produces “happy feeling” negative ions which help to lift your mood, strengthen the immune system and relieve stress. Negative ions have several other benefits to the respiratory system and general well being
  • Moisturizes and refreshes the quality of air we breathe. This feature is important as it humidifies the hot and dry air in the room during summer and winter when heating is switched on
  • SainSonic LM-001BE Ultrasonic 100ML LED Air Humidifier Aroma Diffuser